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Oreo Earthquake Cake

This oreo earthquake cake is a white cake mix loaded with whole oreos and oreo crumbs. Swirl in the cream cheese frosting layer and it bakes into the cake creating frosting filled crevices and cracks on top of the cake.

slice of oreo earthquake cake with scoop of vanilla ice cream on top on white plate

I think most of us fall into the category of oreo lovers! What happens when we put oreos INSIDE dessert? Magic 😍

Think mini oreo cheesecakes, cookies and cream cupcakes and no bake oreo pie.

entire oreo earthquake cake in glass 9x13 inch pan

What is an earthquake cake?

An earthquake cake is a type of cake where you add a layer of cream cheese frosting to the cake batter before you bake the cake. The cream cheese layer “melts” into the cake, creating frosting filled crevices and cracks on top of the cake, hence the name earthquake cake!

This type of cake does not call for frosting on top of the cake because the frosting bakes INTO the cake.

The result is a super moist, easy, all in one done CAKE!

how to make oreo earthquake cake collage with 4 images

How to make Earthquake Cake

All earthquake cake recipes start by layering something on the bottom of a 9×13 inch pan. It could be coconut, chocolate chips, or nuts, or all three. For our oreo earthquake cake, we start by layering whole oreo cookies.

Next, is the cake layer. Use a box of white cake mix then add milk, eggs and oil, plus add in oreo crumbs.

Boom instant oreo cake. Pour the cake batter on top of the oreos.

slice of oreo earthquake cake with scoop of vanilla ice cream on top on with fork going into the cake

The cream cheese frosting is next. Prepare the frosting as directed in the recipe card and transfer it into a piping bag or ziplock bag and pipe the frosting all over the cake. I did mine in a grid pattern and went back and swirled it together with a butter knife.

If you want more oreo goodness, you can crumble in extra oreos on top of the cake before baking.

Then bake this baby!

side shot of oreo earthquake cake in glass pan

Should I refrigerate earthquake cake / a cake with cream cheese? How to store earthquake cake?

The answer to this question depends on the person. Trusted bakers have said that if you’re going to eat the cake in the next day or two and if your house stays around 70 degrees or cooler, you can leave the cake covered on the counter.

However, if your house is warmer, if it’s summer and super hot, the better option is the fridge.

You can always refrigerate this cake overnight if you’ll be serving it the next day, and pull it out of the fridge first thing in the morning so it has time to come to room temperature.

Beth’s opinion: Are you serving the cake within the next day or two? Leave it on the counter, but be sure to cover it with a cake lid or plastic wrap.

slice of oreo earthquake cake with scoop of vanilla ice cream on top on white plate with text overlay

More cake recipes:
Funfetti Earthquake Cake
Classic Earthquake Cake
Doctored Up White Cake


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Oreo Earthquake Cake

Oreo Earthquake Cake

Yield: 9x13 inch cake
Additional Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes

This oreo earthquake cake is a white cake mix loaded with whole oreos and oreo crumbs. Swirl in the cream cheese frosting layer and it bakes into the cake creating frosting filled crevices and cracks on top of the cake.

Ingredients

  • Whole oreos for the bottom of the pan (I used 24 oreos - one package of oreos is enough to use on the bottom of the pan and to make the oreo crumbs called for below

Cake Layer

  • White cake mix, 15.25 oz box
  • 1/2 oreo crumbs
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup milk

Frosting Layer

  • 4 oz cream cheese, softened
  • 1 stick unsalted butter (1/2 cup) melted
  • 1 tbsp vanilla extract
  • 2 & 1/2 cups powdered sugar

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Lightly spray a 9 x 13 inch pan with non-stick cooking spray. Place whole oreos on the bottom of the pan.
  3. Using an electric mixer, beat the white cake mix with the oil, eggs, milk and oreo crumbs until combined on low.
  4. Pour the cake mix on top of the oreos.
  5. Using an electric mixer, beat the cream cheese, melted butter and vanilla until combined. Gradually add the powdered sugar, mixing until thick. Transfer the frosting mixture into a piping bag (or ziplock bag with the corner cut off).
  6. Pipe the frosting mixture over the cake batter, creating any pattern you wish. Use a butter knife to create swirls. 
  7. Bake for 30 minutes. Then loosely place a piece of aluminum foil over the cake and bake for 5-10 more minutes (for a total bake time of 35-40 minutes). 
  8. Allow the cake to cool completely before serving. The frosting layer should “sink” into the cake, creating ribbons of frosting INSIDE the cake! 
  9. Cover and keep on the counter if you’ll be serving the cake in the next day or two. Otherwise refrigerate. 

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8 comments

  1. Yay!!!! The recipe is here! I’m excited to eat this again!!!

  2. Hi Beth – I’m not a fan of cream cheese. :( You think i could replace this with ricotta or something like that? I want to get the consistency right is my concern.

    • Hi Kate! I don’t have any experience substituting ricotta for cream cheese in baking so I can’t give you a well researched answer! The cake doesn’t taste cream cheesy – it just tastes like a sweet frosting!

  3. Can you freeze this cake? Thank you.

    • I wouldn’t recommend it! Haven’t tried it myself in order to say if it thaws okay!

  4. Beth, this sounds wonderful!! (And you are so cute! I really enjoy your posts. ) Do you thing this would work with reduced fat cream cheese? (I know it wouldn’t make that much difference fat-wise, but… there’s a LOT of fat in this recipe!) Thanks!

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